Observe closely from the sidelines when you are not playing: Anup Kumar

Part of the Indian kabaddi team that won the gold at the Asian Games in 2010 and 2014, raider Anup Kumar led his team U Mumba to victory in the second edition of the Pro Kabaddi League (PKL). He was also the most valuable player in the first season of PKL and won the Arjuna Award in 2012.Part of the Indian kabaddi team that won the gold at the Asian Games in 2010 and 2014, raider Anup Kumar led his team U Mumba to victory in the second edition of the Pro Kabaddi League (PKL). He was also the most valuable player in the first season of PKL and won the Arjuna Award in 2012.

The lesson

If there is one player Kumar has learnt a lot from it is Prashant Chavan, a defender who was with Jaipur Pink Panthers in the first two seasons of PKL but has now moved to Puneri Paltan. “He is not tall but he can do so much. He has great willpower and body language. He keeps his opponent guessing.”

Kumar and Chavan played together for Air India for four years. Kumar says Chavan has always played his game the same way. “He has no attitude. He does not lose his cool or unnecessarily become aggressive. He stays calm and concentrates on winning.” Kumar adds that he has tried quite hard to be like him, but to no avail. “I don’t think I can even play 70% of the game he does. He manages to beat me.”

Kumar believes it is important that a kabaddi player, while on the sidelines, closely observe the game to be able to learn a lot from those in it.

We picked up from Whatsapp’s few shortcomings: Deepak Ravindran

WhatsApp and Facebook are our biggest competitors. We have drawn inspiration from WhatsApp, learning from its enormity and reach across the globe. However, it has a few shortcomings when it comes to its privacy concerns.Claim to fame

A college dropout who became famous for starting up the SMZ-based search engine Innoz

The lesson

WhatsApp and Facebook are our biggest competitors. We have drawn inspiration from WhatsApp, learning from its enormity and reach across the globe. However, it has a few shortcomings when it comes to its privacy concerns. It is not the best medium for business to business and business to consumer communications as it encroaches upon the privacy of both parties. This is what we feel was our biggest learning from WhatsApp. And we decided to bridge this gap by coming up with the idea of Lookup, which focuses on a communication system between a local business and its customer directly without having to share any confidential data such as phone numbers or pictures. It’s always great to observe your top competitors and see where they stop, so that you can carry on from there.

HUL, ITC, HDFC taught us the intrapreneurship culture: R Venkataraman

Being part of an exciting journey in IIFL, it has been a continuous learning curve. We picked up a lot of strategies based on hits and misses in our own experiences besides of course learning from the mistakes of others. In our initial days, our founder Nirmal (Jain) was very process-driven given what he had picked up during his stint at HUL.Claim to fame

Has close to two decades of experience in financial services, having worked at ICICI, GE Capital and BZW, amongst other firms

The lesson

Being part of an exciting journey in IIFL, it has been a continuous learning curve. We picked up a lot of strategies based on hits and misses in our own experiences besides of course learning from the mistakes of others. In our initial days, our founder Nirmal (Jain) was very process-driven given what he had picked up during his stint at HUL.

As our business grew, we were inspired by the systems and processes in HDFC Bank and by the leadership of Aditya Puri who redefined industry parameters, challenging fossilised thought processes and archaic work methods. Employee ownership was something we happily borrowed from successful entrepreneurs as we saw the success it gave to firms like Infosys.
Nirmal was also very impressed by the culture of intrapreneurship in organisations like HULBSE 0.22 %, ITC, HDFC where the intrapreneurs led the show. It led us to create a culture of intrapreneurship within IIFL, which has been very fulfilling.
When markets were in a downcycle, we saw many leading brokers succumb to the pressures of competition and the bear market. We managed to successfully diversify into various verticals but always keeping our focus on the financial space. We have seen players diversify randomly into unrelated businesses and lose whatever they had built in their core business. So even today we remain completely focused on the financial service space.

Biggest bank balance does not guarantee pole position: Anisha Singh

Biggest bank balance does not guarantee pole position: Anisha SinghClaim to fame

Began her career on Capitol hill with the Clinton administration, launched her first venture in the US to provide digital content to real estate firms in 2004; started Mydala in 2009.

The lesson

The biggest learning from my rivals is that the biggest bank balance does not guarantee a market leader position. We’ve had several competitors who were more funded and had more cash power behind them. There weren’t many who believed that Mydala would survive and our obituary was written several times. However, we knew we were solving a real need that existed on the merchant front as there were few ways for businesses to market themselves without upfront cash. We have constantly innovated to provide a great user experience. Not only are we still here after six years, we are by far the largest. The best lesson we learnt is just because there is someone with more cash in the bank cannot intimidate us. Our ability to not give up and focus on solving the problem makes us the force that we are.

Tata Power inks MoU with Russian ministry in energy push

Diamond Power Infrastructure

Tata Power has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Ministry of Development of Russian Far East to explore and develop investment opportunities in the energy sector.

“The MoU reflects the mutual intentions of the parties to cooperate for the purpose of realisation of investment projects in the energy sector across the Russian Far East,” Tata Power said in a filing to BSE today.

Under the MoU, the Ministry of Development of Russian Far East will cooperate with and support Tata Power at all stages of investment projects, including assisting the company’s communications with federal and regional authorities, state-owned companies and the private sector, it said.

“The MoU was signed in Moscow by Ashok Sethi, COO and Executive Director, Tata Power, and Alexander Galushka, Minister for Development of Russian Far East,” it added.

Oil explorers push deep into Russia for energy ties

Crude oil prices -stocks bet

ONGC Videsh Ltd (OVL)is in talks to raise its stake in Russia’s second biggest oilfield of Vankor while Indian Oil Corp-Oil India are in negotiations for a stake in Taas-Yuriakh Neftegazodobycha oilfield in East Siberia as India looks to deepen energy ties with Russia.

The slew of agreements signed during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Russia yesterday included a document that provides for cooperation between OVL, the overseas arm of Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC), and Russia’s top oil firm Rosneft.

OVL was originally interested in taking 25 per cent stake in Vankor but Rosneft in September agreed to sell a 15 per cent interest for USD 1.268 billion.

Sources said besides formalising the September deal, OVL Managing Director Narendra K Verma and Rosneft Chairman Igor Sechin also signed a memorandum of understanding in presence of Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin that provides for discussions on raising the stake in Vankor.

IOC and OIL signed a separate MoU with Rosneft where they “agreed to examine the possibility of cooperation in respect of the Taas-Yuriakh Neftegazodobycha LLC asset”, IOC/OIL said in statements.

IOC-OIL are looking at 29 per cent stake in Taas-Yuriakh, which operates the Srednebotuobinsk field. It is expected to produce more than 5 million tonnes of oil annually from 2017.

Rosneft in October sold a 20 per cent share in Taas-Yuriakh to BP for USD 750 million.

OVL and Rosneft yesterday signed an Agreement of Confirmation of successful completion of the first stage of the Indian firm’s acquisition of 15 per cent stake in Vankor.

OVL had on September 4 signed Share Purchase Agreement (SPA) and Shareholders Agreement (SHA) with Vankorneft, a unit of Rosneft that is the developer of the Vankor oil and gas condensate field in Turukhansky district of Krasnoyak territory in Russia.

The field, which has recoverable reserves of 2.5 billion barrels, will give OVL 3.3 million tonnes per annum of oil production.

As per the agreement, OVL had the right to walk out of the deal by October 31 but it chose to stay on and two subsequent agreements – oil marketing pact and oilfield services agreement – were signed, sources said.

This marked the completion of Phase-1 of the deal.

The entire acquisition will be completed in 3-4 months after Rosneft does a reorganisation of the Vankor field company and other regulatory approvals including from Russian anti-monopoly authority are obtained.

The MoU signed by Rosneft and OVL provides for cooperation for geologic survey, exploration and production of hydrocarbons onshore and on the continental shelf of the Russian Federation.

“Particularly, the companies will analyse the possibility of expanding their partnership aimed at the development of perspective Rosneft projects in East Siberia”, OVL said in a statement.

Now get healthcare at your doorsteps for a few more bucks

Established in 2013, Noida-based Health Care at Home India (HCAH), a joint venture backed by the Burman family (promoters of Dabur, India) and the founders of Health Care at Home, UK, claims to carry out roughly 5,000 visits in a month, offering services in the range of Rs 500 to Rs 20,000 per day. (Representative photo by Reuters)

The Indian healthcare market is growing fast and so is the cost of medical services at hospitals. Amid the rapidly increasing burden of chronic diseases, and the demand for quality medical care, especially for the elderly, the market is now opening up for home-based healthcare services.

Start-ups such as Portea Medical, Health Care at Home India, Homital, India Home Health Care and a few others are now taking medical services ranging from home nutrition to ICU, post-surgery care, oncology, physiotherapy and everyday healthcare to doorsteps. According to accounting and consultancy firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), India’s home healthcare industry, which consists of home-based medical devices and home services, is worth $2 billion and growing 20 per cent annually.

Portea Medical, which claims to be India’s largest home healthcare provider, handles 60,000 visits a month across 24 cities in India, and 60 per cent of its customer base comprises those above 60 years of age. While it does not handle emergency care, Portea focuses on general primary healthcare, post-hospitalisation care, chronic disease management and allied services.

When doctors decided to discharge Rima Bhattacharjee’s father, she and her mother, though relieved, were sceptical. The retired senior executive with a steel major had undergone a surgery after a blood clot in brain that left one side of his body paralysed. While the mother-daughter duo was not sure if they could take proper care of the patient at home, Rima decided to get professional help at home. Seven months on, Rima, who works with an IT firm is more than happy to see her father walk.

Entrepreneur Brij Sethi could not save his father, but says he is glad he opted for professional home care because of which his father could spend “his last days with the family at home.” He is thankful to the doctors and the healthcare attendants who looked after his father for two years, ever since he underwent a coronary artery bypss surgery.

With both sons working in the US, the octogenarian Pai couple in Bengaluru had no one to look after their medical needs at home. Homecare services came to their aid and they now have a qualified nurse visiting every fortnight doing the regular checks and guiding them on medicines. “Having her come home and check on us has made a huge difference in our lives,” says Mr Pai, 84.

Established in 2013, Noida-based Health Care at Home India (HCAH), a joint venture backed by the Burman family (promoters of Dabur, India) and the founders of Health Care at Home, UK, claims to carry out roughly 5,000 visits in a month, offering services in the range of Rs 500 to Rs 20,000 per day.

HCAH says its ICU and oncology-based services are 50 per cent cheaper than those provided in hospitals. With regard to long-term care, readmission rates and hospital-acquired infection, home care is roughly 90 per cent cheaper than hospital care, it claims.

Currently providing its services in Delhi-NCR, Chandigarh, Punjab, Haryana, Mumbai, Jammu, Himachal Pradesh, Rajasthan, HCAH also has presence in Bengaluru, Hyderabad and Ahmedabad and it plans to add a new section, which will be maternity-based services, in Delhi.

Apollo Hospitals group, too, has introduced such services in Hyderabad, Chennai and Delhi, looking at elderly care, domestic and NRI dependents, non-communicable diseases, chronic kidney diseases, post-discharge and post-surgical care, and preventive care for people aged 40-60 years. “Earlier, a family needed to go to several doctors across different locations for geriatric care, basic primary care, post-operative care, routine check-ups etc, however, we have consolidated the management of all of this,” says Meena Ganesh, MD & CEO, Portea Medical.

Sabeena George, 52, was almost immobile due to severe pain in her knees. Unable to move out of her house for treatment, she signed up for Portea. After full physiotherapy sessions at home, she says, she can now lead a normal life again.

Dr Gaurav Thukral, vice-president and business unit director, Health Care at Home India, believes the concept of home healthcare will transform healthcare delivery in India. “From reducing the pressure on the hospital infrastructure to ensuring smooth transition from hospital to home and reducing chances of re-admissions,” he said.

Thukral hopes the health industry will align its services and offerings with the concept of home-based healthcare in the near future. He also feels that HCAH will reach most of the Tier II and Tier III cities in the next two years. “Healthcare at home is not just affordable, but comfortable too. Home-based healthcare also saves patients and their families from the problems arising out of the psychological stress because of frequent hospital visits and stays. Also, for hospitals, the most important benefit of home-based healthcare is that it helps reduce their burden,” adds Thukral.

Will it impact business of hospitals?

Dr Mahesh Joshi, CEO, Apollo Homecare, does not think so. He believes homecare is an industry that will see a big boom in India in the next decade. “This business is complementary to the hospitals in ensuring brand continuum, care continuum… It also enables them to reduce the average length of stay and ensures efficient utilisation of existing bed capacity. They can also improve the average revenue per occupied bed if they work out the synergy in the right manner with the homecare providers,” says Dr Joshi.

Portea CEO Meena Ganesh feels the existing healthcare system is overburdened and India urgently requires a robust home healthcare delivery mechanism to deal with the massive need brought on by the country’s rapidly greying population and growth of chronic diseases.

“People are living longer and are living with illnesses that are chronic in nature and need recurrent visits to doctors. Homecare is an initiative to reach beyond hospitals, to patients and their families, to not just add years to the lives but also add life to the years that are ahead of us,” Dr Joshi sums up.

*The patients mentioned in the beginning of the copy are HCAH and Portea clients.

Sun Pharmaceutical raises Rs 1,000 cr via NCDs

sun pharma L

Drug major Sun Pharmaceutical Industries today said it has raised Rs 1,000 crore through issuance of non-convertible debentures (NCDs) on private placement basis.

“Sun Pharma Laboratories Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the company, has raised, on private placement basis, Rs 1,000 crore by allotment of 10,000 unsecured redeemable non-convertible debentures of a face value of Rs 10,00,000 each,” Sun Pharmaceutical Industries said in a BSE filing.

It further said: “NCDs will be listed on BSE Ltd under two series with Series 1 debentures comprising 5,000 debentures amounting to Rs 500 crore with a tenor of 24 months, and Series 2 debentures comprising 5,000 debentures amounting to Rs 500 crore with a tenor of 39 months.”

The company did not elaborate on the usage of proceeds.

Shares of Sun Pharma were trading at Rs 795.40 apiece on BSE, up 0.55 per cent from the previous close.

Wipro to buy Viteos Group for $130 mn to strengthen capital markets portfolio

Wipro

IT major Wipro on Wednesday announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Viteos Group, a BPaaS provider for the Alternative Investment Management Industry for $130 million.

The company said in a release that the acquisition will expand Wipro’s capital markets portfolio in fund accounting services and enhance company’s Business Process Services capabilities.

Viteos’ proprietary platform, which offer transformation and integration of psot-trade operations can be leveraged to launch solutions across oter segments of Capital markets. These technology-based solutions will bring in non-linear and higher revenue realisation.

Viteos Group was founded in 2003 and has presence in US, India, Europe, Cayman islands and Singapore.

The acquisition is subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals and will be completed in the quarter ending March 31, 2016.

Wipro’s senior vice-president and head-business process services Nagendra Bandaru said, “We are excited to join hands with Viteos and expand our Capital markets portflit in fund accounting services and enhance our business process capabilities.”

Shares of Wipro were trading 0.22 per cent up at Rs 556.85 in early trade.

Biocon introduces therapy for treatment of Hepatitis C in India

Biocon

Biocon on Thursday announced introduction of an advanced novel therapy for the treatment of Hepatitis C in India – CIMIVIR-L.

CIMIVIR-L is a once-a-day oral therapy that the company claims will offer a convenient, effective and safe alternative to people infected with Hepatitis C virus. CIMIVIR-L is a fixed dose combination of Ledipasvir 90 mg and Sofosbuvir 400 mg, which is equivalent of the innovator product commercialised by Gilead Sciences in the US.

The Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI) recentle approved the sale of Sofosbuvir-Ledispasvir combination, which is being manufactured in India under licence from Gilead.

Biocon’s CIMIVIR-L will be made available to patients in India at a a fraction of the global cost of the innovator brand. The cost of a 12-week course of this combination therapy in the US is $94,500 (around Rs 63 lakhs).

Ravi Limaye, president – marketing, Biocon said, “The introduction of CIMIVIR-L will strengthen Biocon’s current porfoli of Virology products. It furthers our commitment to offer affordable therapy of unmet patient needs in debilitating and life-threatening conditions.”

Shares of the company were trading 5.24 per cent up at Rs 507.00 in morning trade.